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Hadogenes paucidens

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Topic Hadogenes paucidens

Post by LXDNG79 on Sun Feb 17, 2013 10:25 pm

In response to the many recent questions about the appropriate substrate and housing of Hadogenes paucidends, I'll just share the moderate range of experiences I've had in keeping them.

For my first female I set her up like this from what I had lying around

Substrate is a mix of sand+fine gravel and sprinkled bark chips. Still unconvinced of my initial approach I applied a marked boundary to find out what she preferred.

You may find this a useful strategy for any scorpion if you are unsure

Hides

A wide shallow water dish is usually recommended but I found them to be more accustomed to taking water that seep in through the wood or cracks in rock much like rain shower in the wild.. For assurance this, spray directly on top of the hide until the water trickles down to the scorpion... They will avoid any substantial body contact with the water but they will take a drink.

Ideal Setup

Though scorpions don't distinguish color very well, their pectines underneath give them an intimate sense of surfaces upon which they reside. In this setup, my H. paucidens evidently feel at home. The substrate here is:-
50% - sand
40% - fine gravel
10% - DRY coco fibre or sprinkled bark chips....

As with all scorpions, replicating the conditions as close as possible to their natural environment is essential to their longevity in captivity. It would be great if anyone could get photos of them in their natural habitat in South Africa, as that would help tremendously.

If the conditions are right, they should remain in their hides with few exceptions: -

1. Gravid females do leave their hides to bask under the warm light.


2. Males by contrast usually leave their hides to wander most likely in search of mates

Sexual dimorphism is evident in the male's comparatively longer metasoma (tail... thought it isn't really), and more streamlined abdomen.

Breeding Tank
Though non-communal, breeding pairs can be housed together provided there are at least 1 or more empty hides between them.

A safe way to do this is to put the female in first and let her reside in a chosen hide. As soon as she is stationed, you may barricade her in with a piece of rock/wood/plastic lid before you put in the male. Let the male find his own hide or you can coax him in to the one at the other end of the enclosure from the female. Later (or at night) remove the barricade and stay awhile to observe the first initial contact.

Scorpion mating can be quite aggressive so don't be to hasty to intervene. If the female is willing, she will exit her hide via the males lead and they will do their thing for... you can leave them alone after that. The male may sting the female to calm her down... this is normal. Once they part the male will scurry off in to one of the many extra hides you have provided...

Babies may take forever to arrive. Birth of the litter will be triggered by a sudden drop in temperature and rise in humidity following the seasonal changes in their natural environment.

I hope that helps with the FAQs... Please feel free to post any questions you may have on this thread. If you had any variant experiences from mine, please share them here too... coz I'm also still learning.
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LXDNG79
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Topic Re: Hadogenes paucidens

Post by Liocheles on Thu Feb 28, 2013 4:29 pm

hi Alex bro, i have a pair of H.paucidens (i hope they are, based on the tail morphology.. but i can't tell if they are). how big the size they get of both sex..? because i got the pair without any information bout them, i mean i don't know what instar they are. my guess, they're at 5th instar right now, and seems that will take a long long long time for their breeding project.
oh one more thing, heard that the scorplings are hard to raise, is that true?
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Topic Re: Hadogenes paucidens

Post by LXDNG79 on Fri Mar 01, 2013 10:01 pm

Yes... at least based on my experience, the scorplings are rather difficult to raise... none survived to 3rd instar in my first batch. My second batch from my other female was more resilient. I had to sell some off but kept 4 for myself. Currently, I have one lone survivor of this batch.

If you can get them to 3rd or 4th instar, most of the delicate period is over. The problem comes during the molting where they damage their delicate metasomas (tails). Because the neural nerve runs right through it, any significant damage to this part of the body will result in the inevitable death of the any scorpion. The key to this is simulating the correct humidity level that will allow the scorpion to molt successfully. I can't pin point this to a number but in general you have to compensate for the climate difference between where you are keeping the scorpion and South Africa. So keeping them in Europe or UK is easier than raising them in the tropics because the climate is more compatible.

And Yes its takes forever for them to mature. They are known to have one of the longest lifespans of any scorpion; approximately 30 years or more and take about 8-10 years to reach full maturity from birth, and with an animal with such a long lifespan there is more room for error.

Mine is at 4th instar and still under an inch and a half. Power feeding won't really speed things up because they just have an extremely slow metabolic rate. Sometimes they just refuse to eat for weeks; taking one/two small crickets/mealworms between long fasting periods. Even the adults eat very little and they eat very slowly, and when they've eaten their fill they often will refuse anything for more than a month. Perfectly adapted to a barren environment with low frequency in prey items.

I'm not sure at which stage they have to be before you can sex them, but I'm guessing that apparent sexual dimorphism of the metasomas only occurs in adulthood. I can only guess because I haven't gotten there yet myself. If you got them as juvenile or sub-adult, you might as well presume them to be Hadogenes sp. as more often than not their true identity can only be accurately determined as adults, unless you have reliable literature on the genus with a species key for all 18 species of Hadogenes

i hope that answers most of your queries, Cheers and best regards!
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Topic Re: Hadogenes paucidens

Post by DolbyR on Sat Mar 02, 2013 6:43 am

LXDNG79 wrote:If you got them as juvenile or sub-adult, you might as well presume them to be Hadogenes sp. as more often than not their true identity can only be accurately determined as adults, unless you have reliable literature on the genus with a species key for all 18 species of Hadogenes

Doesn't the colorations between tergates act as a pretty reliable factor for ID'ing these? Atleast between troglodytes and paucidens. Other than those two, I've never seen other Hadogenes spp. in the hobby, though there probably are some mis-indentified ones circuling.

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Topic Re: Hadogenes paucidens

Post by DolbyR on Sun Mar 24, 2013 1:51 pm

Alex, could you maybe get us a size comparison pic for mature specimens?
Something like a specimen next to a ruler or measuring tape?

I know these should be smaller than troglodytes, but I'm interested to know what their real size is as matured specimens.

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Topic Re: Hadogenes paucidens

Post by LXDNG79 on Mon Mar 25, 2013 3:38 am

Unfortunately these are pics from my old collection which I don't have anymore... but if I find any pics from my archive that will help with the size comparison I'll post it up.

Cheers and best regards
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Topic Re: Hadogenes paucidens

Post by DolbyR on Fri Mar 29, 2013 8:10 am

LXDNG79 wrote:Unfortunately these are pics from my old collection which I don't have anymore

We never get enough photos when we should, do we?
Same here, regretting I don't have good and clear pics from some specimens I no longer have.

Thanks for the efforts bro.

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